Satori Yoga will open in its new space on Sutter Street in San Francisco Wednesday October 1st. Until Then I will be teaching my prenatal classes at Moksha Life Center  (405 Sansome Street 3rd floor) Mondays and Wednesdays 2-3pm.

For updates on the move go to Satori Yoga

See you at Satori in October!

Simple Yoga — Mondays and Fridays 1-2pm

Simple yoga shapes, breathing techniques, and strength building exercises aimed at helping you increase your functional flexibility, strength and stamina, while bringing calm and quiet to the mind.  Simple Yoga is perfect for beginners, those coming back to yoga or working with an injury. It’s also ideal for long time and advanced yogis who wish to focus a little deeper or refine their practice, and those who wish to build more strength into their practice. This is also a practice that is extremely beneficial and accessible to athletes – cyclists, crossfitters, tri-athletes, climbers, etc who wish to improve flexibility and rejuvenate.

Prenatal Yoga — Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays 2-3pm

Yoga, strength work, a little birth prep, chatter about pregnancy and rest.


I am so excited to be offering this series again at Bernal Yoga starting Monday November 4th.

Simple, Steady & Joyful Yoga

Strength, Stamina and Flexibility in Body and Mind.

55 Minutes of Yoga

 4-Week Series $60

Single Class $17

Mondays 5:00-5:55pm November 4th, 11th, 18th & 25th

Bernal Yoga

sign up here

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A Yoga Practice does not need to be complicated or strenuous to be deep and effective. According to Patanaji, the Papa of Yoga, who wrote it’s more or less central text many moons upon centuries ago called The Yoga Sutra – your practice should always be a combination of sthira and sukha. Which, in plain English speak means your daily practice (or anytime you venture to practice) should be steady or regular and mindful (sthira) and comfortable,  joyful and ease-creating (sukha).

The Simple Yoga Series is a good introduction to the Asanas (Yoga Shapes) and the Pranayama (breathing exercises of Yoga). The class is sequenced so that we work on strengthening and stretching the muscles needed to hold each shape before we go into the shape to increase our stamina and comfort in each Asana. In working slowly and focusing on alignment I believe we can move into each shape with grace and be at ease even in a demanding Asana. This strength based approach makes this series a great one for more advanced Yogi’s looking to gain more stamina, focus on alignment and prevent the injuries that can come from relying on flexibility alone to move through the Asana practice.

The most important aspect of your Yoga practice is not the extent to which you can do an Asana (that is what the shapes of Yoga are called) and how many advanced variations you can cram into a practice, nor is it how adept you are at sitting in meditation, knowing the names and personalities of the Hindu Pantheon or the ins and outs of Indian Philosophy. It is absolutely not important that you own cute designer Yoga attire. What is important is the extent to which you participate in your practice, and the integrity and compassion towards yourself that you bring to it. Noticing how we feel in each posture as we inhabit it each time we venture to make it and noticing what our breathing tells us about our participation in the shape is what is important in the practice of Yoga. That is how we make it our practice, and how it becomes a steady and joyful life enhancement.

This series is open to students of all levels and abilities. Beginners and advanced students will have something to gain from this simple practice.

Love,

Megan

Megan_2


I am really enticed about this new series I will be offering at Bernal Yoga starting Monday September 9th.

Simple, Steady & Joyful Yoga

Strength, Stamina and Flexibility in Body and Mind.

55 Minutes of Yoga

Bernal Yoga

Mondays 5:00-5:55pm
September 9th, 16th, 23rd & 30th

4-Week Series $60

sign up here

IMG_20130718_102521

 

A Yoga Practice does not need to be complicated or strenuous to be deep and effective. According to Patanaji, the Papa of Yoga, who wrote it’s more or less central text many moons upon centuries ago called The Yoga Sutra – your practice should always be a combination of sthira and sukha. Which, in plain English speak means your daily practice (or anytime you venture to practice) should be steady or regular and mindful (sthira) and comfortable,  joyful and ease-creating (sukha).

The most important aspect of your Yoga practice is not the extent to which you can do an Asana (that is what the shapes of Yoga are called) and how many advanced variations you can cram into a practice, nor is it how adept you are at sitting in meditation, knowing the names and personalities of the Hindu Pantheon or the ins and outs of Indian Philosophy. It is absolutely not important that you own cute designer Yoga attire. What is important is the extent to which you participate in your practice, and the integrity and compassion towards yourself that you bring to it. Noticing how we feel in each posture as we inhabit it each time we venture to make it and noticing what our breathing tells us about our participation in the shape is what is important in the practice of Yoga. That is how we make it our practice, and how it becomes a steady and joyful life enhancement.

In this series you will get a hand out of the sequences we learn. There are two. Each is complete in itself, and complete in its parts. You can practice the whole thing on a given day. That should take you anywhere from 40 minutes to an hour, depending on how long you spend in each pose. I have given general guidelines which should be about a one hour practice. You can do the individual sequences that make up the whole if you just want to focus on one thing on a given day or have little time. It is great to be able to do some Yoga every day.

This series is open to students of all levels and abilities. Beginners and advanced students will have something to gain from this simple practice.

Love,

Megan

Megan_2


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Yay! We are back for round 2!

Think tiny living room concert and book reading a little wine, a little tea among friends in a beautiful room and you will get the jist.

Put down your phone, get off the internet and join us for a FREE night of music and readings exploring and celebrating the talents of local folks who touch our lives with their music and words.

Like always I am so excited about our guests this time round. The wonderful HoneyBelles will play a few sets and Laila Kramer will share some stories with us as well as a few insights into how to start writing that memoir you are thinking of starting and of course never sharing…And there may be a few surprise guests. See you there.

The HoneyBelles

belles

The HoneyBelles are a fun-loving band of friends and family that fuse 1930’s-style swing and old-time originals with modern lyrics and lush harmonies. We all sing! Alanna Taylor-Tobin (ukulele), Jay Doane (fiddle), Jessie Potter (percussion), Julie Antti (upright bass), and Cierra Potter (vocals)

Laila Kramer

photo(1)

Since retiring as an ESL instructor at City College of San Francisco, Laila Kramer has continued to teach and to learn. She volunteers in a Spanish bilingual kindergarten class where she shares her love of books with eager five and six year-olds. Laila is currently writing a memoir about her childhood in Hyde Park, on the south side of Chicago, and her grown-up years in her adopted city of San Francisco. In between words, Laila enjoys practicing yoga and taking Lindy Hop and Argentine tango dance classes. She also loves searching for seashells at the beach with her grandson and playing Scrabble with him on rainy afternoons.


Forget safety.
Live where you fear to live.
Destroy your reputation.
Be notorious.
― Rumi

Francis Bebey – The Cola Coffee Song

 


As a yoga teacher who often feels like a babbling brook of ADHD vignettes this OPEN LETTER
TO THE SUBSTITUTE YOGA TEACHER WHO WON’T STOP WITH THE IMAGERY
both made me fear and quake and tremble at the recognition of myself and laugh hysterically at the recognition of myself….please let me know if I step over the line. I want to know. I want to know.

But, this letter also made me grateful – it is a reminder that most often less is more and that life should always be taken with a grain of salt and a dash of pepper.

I too have been in those classes where there is endless babble about what, I don’t know…in an attempt to make moving the body and breathing ‘more meaningful.’ It is meaningful already. Imagery is helpful if it helps you get inside and find something. Stories of one’s day are good in and of themselves because they are connections and Yoga is a both an invitation and celebration of connection.

In case you couldn’t be bothered to click the above link, which you should because the other letters are great too!!!! here is the letter:

from http://www.mcsweeneys.net/links/openletters/
AN OPEN LETTER
TO THE SUBSTITUTE
YOGA TEACHER WHO
WON’T STOP WITH
THE IMAGERY.

April 16, 2010

– – – –

Dear Substitute Yoga Teacher Who Won’t Stop With The Imagery,

It’s not like you’re the first. Other substitute teachers have come out with some real dillys too. Who can forget “think of your spine as a flexible snake in space?” So I expect people subbing for the regular, non-imagery-inclined-teacher to spout wacky shit.

But the problem with you, Substitute Teacher Who Won’t Stop With The Imagery, is that your lust for describing things by what they are not is like a runaway train careening through my body-as-temple on wings of steel. (Accompanied by bouts of psychotic ujjayi breathing.)

It begins as soon as you walk in the door. Like all of us, you’ve already had some mundane thing happen that day, but your mundane thing is inspirational, annoying in itself. Say you walked the dog and it was sunny. Sun + pet = return to simplicity and unbridled panting. Or maybe the dog ate lots of grass. (Filling the void, freeing the void… something about a heaving void.) Your daily life/revelation is difficult to ignore as you walk among us, a Lululemon clad priestess (to use language you might understand), dispensing epiphanies and the faintest whiff of dog.

Today you told us you played your flute at dawn, prompting the revelation that we are all instruments, all the time. As we began in cross-legged position you observed that our “sits bones” are like that prong thing at the base of a cello. Try as I might, thinking “my ass is a cello” did not help me sit up any straighter. By the time we got to forward lunge with inner thighs conducting prana so as to vibrate the jiggly bits like violin strings, I had an urge to remind you that strings can snap, but kept schtum since I was trying to play my instrument pianissimo. Forte gets you kicked out of yoga.

The first time you appeared it was on Canada’s national holiday called, cleverly, “Canada Day.” It has no traditions other than sleeping late and drinking. Us regulars dragged our sorry cellos out of bed and came to yoga anyway; little knowing that while in triangle position we’d be forced to view one extremity as Vancouver, the other as Halifax. (I guess even you aren’t flexible enough to cross the Gulf of St. Lawrence to Newfoundland.) I had to do a meditation on vodka tonics just to try and block out the imagery, but the stress of trying to relax with you in the room made me strain a muscle in Halifax anyway.

So here’s the thing. I don’t want to think of my kneecaps rising like excited birds in flight just because you happened to see cormorants wheeling across the city as if someone were hunting them (which maybe someone was because they’re really filthy birds). I don’t want to embrace risk with my heart center because your house offer fell through. (Since when can a yoga teacher afford to buy a house?). I just want to do the goddamn yoga. So please stop with the imagery, already.

Sincerely,
Li Robbins

check it out

May 12, 2011


Much love and thanks to the amazing and inspirational Faern Works…

image by Faern Works

Check it out – MegaRedfish down town yoga and an interview… SoHum:Self-Expression Through Yoga

The invitation of Yoga

October 4, 2010


In my practice and teaching Hatha Yoga – the physical asanas (poses) and pranayama (breathing) – are an invitation to explore your phyiscal body in space and time. And from this experience to be invited to be present to all that is outside ourselves. The more aware and at home we become in our own bodies the more compassionate we can be towards ourselves and that just grows outwards towards all beings. The work of Yoga on the mat is a profound practice of presence.

One of the teachers who has inspired both my practice and my teaching is Don Stapleton. He has a practice called Self-Awakening Yoga. His approach is an organic and somatic invitation into YOUR body and spirit. It is beautiful.

Many wisdom traditions throughout history consider the body to be a temple for the spirit. In order to create a conscious and functional relationship with the body, I prefer to begin with an image that is less grandiose than a temple. A temple is an awesome destination. Going to a temple requires that I leave my home and my everyday life to seek contact with the divine. There are times and places for this journey, moments in life when pilgrimage to a place beyond home is desirable and appropriate exactly for the separation from everyday life that it affords. But, I choose not to approach the body in this manner.

Rather than a temple of magnificent marble columns and lofty spires, I am inviting you into an image of your body that is more personal, more like a cozy seat in front of a hearth shared with your most trusted friend. This trusted friend beside you is yourself – not the icon of a supreme being, not an authority on mystical transcendence, but your own inner advisor. – Don Stapleton, Ph.D

Yoga is a profound and practical practice of becoming more present in this physical life we have been gifted. And, the more present we are the more responsible we are for a our actions in this life. And, the hope is then – that the more apt we are to choose love as our response.

megaredfish song of the moment:

love.

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